Q&A with Trilobite Specialist Dr. Lukáš Laibl

Dr. Lukas Laibl in the fieldDr. Lukáš Laib in the Fezouata lagerstätte near Zagora, Morocco. Credit: Martina Nohejlová.

Czech palaeontologist Dr. Lukáš Laibl shares wide ranging tips for anyone interested in the study of fossils. His dedicated research about trilobite development and evolution (and trilobite larvae in particular) provides a glimpse into the excitement of discovering unexpected facts about the prehistoric past. Dr. Laibl’s road to a career in palaeontology was heavily influenced by natural history books and he was happy to recommend several books and resources for fellow enthusiasts and aspiring palaeontologists.   

August 24, 2017 by Peter Lovisek

From Sauropods to Microfossils: Meet Professor Jacqueline M. Richard

Jacqueline M. Richard - Paleontologist and Geology Professor, Delgado Community College

In our first instalment of "Profiles in Paleontology" we share a lively and informative discussion with geology professor and paleontologist Jacqueline M. Richard. Several topics were covered, including her pathway to a career in paleontology, teaching experiences at Delgado Community College, fieldwork in Nevada and North Dakota and the challenges of excavating sauropod bones. She also spoke about her fascinating work with microfossils aimed at understanding the extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs, 66 million years ago. 

June 27, 2017 by Peter Lovisek

Probing the Origins of Life: Q&A with NASA Scientist Dr. Chris McKay

Dr. Chris McKay in Antarctica. Source: NASA

Dr. Chris McKay in Antarctica. Source: NASA

How life originated is one of the deepest mysteries of science - this profound question has perplexed humankind for thousands of years. Now, in the twenty-first century, astrobiologists and other scientists have the tools to investigate it; yet, it remains extremely challenging to answer. 

Baby bird found in Burmese amber: Q&A with Dr. Ryan McKellar

Baby bird found in Burmese amber: Q and A with Dr. Ryan McKellar

The shocking discovery of a Cretaceous toothed bird preserved in Burmese amber has made headlines around the world. The 99-million year old hatchling is the best-preserved specimen of its kind: features such as eyelids, ear openings and even feather pigmentation remain. The specimen expands our understanding of early feathers and sheds light on the anatomy, development and lifestyle of a major group of Mesozoic birds, the Enantiornithes, which lived alongside the dinosaurs. 

June 13, 2017 by Peter Lovisek