Fossil Plesiosaur Tooth in Phosphate Rock

$40.00 USD

Inventory quantity available: 44

This genuine fossil tooth belonged to a Plesiosaur (Zarafasaura oceanis) a ferocious prehistoric marine reptile that lived 70 million years ago. It’s embedded in the original phosphate rock matrix and is nicely preserved.

Plesiosaur swam in the oceans thought out the entire dinosaur period from the triassic to the cretaceous from to 235 to 66 millions years ago. This plesiosaur had an extremely long neck and four flippers in fact the Arabic word for giraffe is Zarafa. This specie of Plesiosaur grew to about 7 meters in length about the same size as the largest great white shark ever caught.    

Resent research has shown that long neck Plesiosaur had a diet of clams, snails and crabs, and not fish as previously believed.

They were collected in the phosphate deposit of Khourigba, Morocco. 

Every tooth is slightly different, as they are unique fossils. 

 Age: Late Cretaceous - approximately 70 million years old.